Special issues: call for proposals

The Journal of Literature and Trauma Studies invites guest editors to submit proposals for special issues in any area related to trauma and literature. Particular areas of interest are: 1) trauma narratives of native, indigenous, and aboriginal people; 2) trauma and displacement caused by climate change, 3) trauma narratives in Latin-American literatures; 3) the human crisis in the Mediterranean.

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Issue 8:1

front cover 8:1

Contents

Palestinian Postmemory: Melancholia and the Absent Subject in Larissa Sansour’s In Vitro, Saleem Haddad’s “Song of the Birds,” and Adania Shibli’s Touch - Layla AlAmmar

Therapeutic Applications of Ciné-théâtre in Reframing Trauma Narratives and Attenuating Posttraumatic Distress in the Survivors of Sexual Violence: Koffi Kwahulé’s Les Recluses - Eric Wistrom

Testimony, Aporia, and the Holocaust in the Poems of Dan Pagis - Ashok K. Mohapatra

Trauma and Colonial Specters in Assia Djebar’s Fiction - Amar Guendouzi

A Russian Poetics of Trauma: Encounters with Death and the Literary Reclamation of the Individual - Laurie Vickroy

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Issue 7:2

Revisiting the Sites of Trauma: The War Poetry of
Siegfried Sassoon, Edmund Blunden, and Richard Hugo - Michael Sarnowski

Ricoeur’s Theory of Metaphor as Trauma Praxis - Iris J. Gildea

Dystopia, Trauma, and Resignation: A Reading of Perec’s W,
or the Memory of Childhood and Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go - Annabel Herzog

Postmemory’s Graphic Symptom: Disembodied
Voice, Repetition Compulsion, and Working
through Trauma in GB Tran’s Vietnamerica - Jin Lee

Forms of Mediation in Ari Folman’s Waltz with Bashir - Donato Loia

Review
Guy Beiner, Forgetful Remembrance. Social Forgetting
and Vernacular Historiography of a Rebellion in Ulster - Catriona Kennedy

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Issue 7:1

Symptoms of Psychological Problems among Children of Holocaust Survivors: Faye Sholiton’s The Interview - Gene A. Plunka

The Politics of Parenting in Nancy Huston’s Fault Lines: Transgenerational Trauma Revisited - Susan Bainbrigge

The Trauma of the Archive in Sinan Antoon’s Novel Fihris - Sami Alkyam

Guests of Empire, Ghosts of Dispossession: Traumatic Loss and the Subject without a Proper Name in The Gangster

We Are All Looking For - Yasuko Kase

The Banal Sublime of Postcolonial Bombay and Calcutta: The Embodied Ghosts, Falling Bodies, and Tangled Webs in

Chandra’s “Dharma” and Chaudhuri’s A Strange and Sublime Address - Molly Volanth Hall

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Issue 6:1/2 Literature and Trauma after Hiroshima: A Japanese-English Bilingual Issue

This bilingual issue has a threefold purpose: to expose, map, and encounter the primary moment of the catastrophe from a Japanese perspective—made available here to most Anglophone readers for the first time. The concomitant and secondary effort is aimed at examining some of the patterns of evasion and repetition that characterize the suppressed moment of cultural and historical adaptation and reaction to the catastrophe, with the final hope of opening up the debates surrounding the critical responses to the atomic bombings, understood as one of the central traumatic “limit events” of our epoch, to an alternative set of cultural, critical, and literary perspectives.

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Call for chapters

Contributions are invited for consideration to be published in a collection of essays on trauma informed pedagogy in the college classroom. Recent evidence has become clear and compelling that many students enrolled in colleges and universities across the U.S. and internationally suffer from effects of multiple forms of traumatic experiences.  These include but are not …

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Issue 5:2 Narrating Gender and Trauma

This special issue stems from the international conference Trauma and Gender in Twentieth-Century European Literature, organized in March 2016 at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow under the aegis of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare, and with the kind support of the Wellcome Trust.1 The studies included here explore how the axis between trauma and gender intersects in a range of narratives by men and women writers and filmmakers in twentieth-and twenty-first-century Europe. The issue discusses the ill-effects of war as experienced by soldiers but also its long-lasting impact on civilians as manifested in different forms of trauma. In other words, it looks, from the perspective of gender, into the expression of trauma caused either by the historical context (World War I, World War II, Francoism, etc.) or by personal events. In so doing, it is significant that some recurrent themes emerge, such as silence, rape, illness, death, and, indeed, the trauma of gender itself.

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“After Hiroshima” Symposium

Professor Kinya Nishi, Konan University, Japan 
"A Postmodern Hiroshima? Trauma, History, and Poetic Language in Modern Japan"
10th November, 1.30-3.00 pm, Manchester Metropolitan University, GM302 .
Organised by Dr David Miller, Department of English Studies, MMU, with the generous assistance of the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation.

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Issue 5:1 North African, Armenian and Arab Literatures

The articles here—focusing on the experience and manifestations of trauma in North African, Armenian, and Arab literatures— seek to articulate the relationships of trauma, suffering, and literature in critical and hermeneutic modes that are rooted in the contexts themselves. One strand that stands out in all the articles here is a concern with the “history” of suffering and the possible narration, poetic or prosaic, of the past and the struggle that must occur for the essential nature and significance of that suffering to emerge into clear and full historical recognition. This issue attempts to contribute to this necessity, incorporating articles that cover notions as diverse as the concept of “Levantine literature” and the status of the “voice” in a dialogue of Jewish and Arab literatures, the public role of the poet in relation to human rights and illegal incarceration, the gendering of the Algerian national liberation struggle, and the conceptual and literary significance of the attempted Armenian genocide. All these articles attest to a strong sense of an expanding perspective and the renewing force of literature and trauma studies as it establishes its conceptual vigour and literary and intellectual significance.

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